Jump to content


Photo

"Modern" Design Thread


  • Please log in to reply
371 replies to this topic

#1 lindapoirier

lindapoirier

    De Stijl

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,515 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 02:52 PM

I have been in love with mid-century design, I think, my whole life. I can't say exactly where it started but I figure it was my oldest sister. Her husband had space helmet 8-track player on the top of the kitchen fridge. I searched for years for one and finally got one in university at a "trendy" shop in montreal.

Design and the many incarnations of "Modern" are, imo, a bit of a misnomer because I think that the peak of "Modern" was somewhere in the 1960s. I think modern design tries to innovate but I really don't think it has gotten better since that decade. It all started with the idea of making great design affordable to the masses, at least here in North America that was the idea.

Modern Design has filtered into just about every aspect of our lives and we may not even know it. I collect 50s and 60s and I see so many knock-offs in today's market but I wanted to start a thread about design and in particular, MODERN. So, let's talk about it. Let's share ideas and pictures!

I wanted to demonstrate to you the breadth of it's reach through these simple totes/handbags. I didn't even realize that I had a small collection of them until last week. I must have been using these over the years and finding them here and there. I don't know too much about them. I believe that they are from the 60s, possibly the 70s but I think you can't get a better example of the idea of designing a "modern" look for the masses that is useful and cheap to produce. They are some kind of malleable plastic, very close to rubber in texture. Ha! They may even be rubber. I have this idea that they were made for the beach. A handbag that could be cleaned easily yet able to carry your towel and supplies.

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

I have a yellow one too.

So, how do you feel about design in your life? Do you actively search it out to be part of your living space? Are you aware of how design and function are interrelated? Do you care?

Edited by lindapoirier, 13 April 2011 - 02:54 PM.


#2 billdore

billdore

    White Blood Cells

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6,298 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 03:51 PM

The first two look a bit like shuttlecocks. Just happy I had an occasion write that sentence, really.

Edited by billdore, 13 April 2011 - 03:51 PM.


#3 Maschine Man

Maschine Man

    De Stijl

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,161 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 04:06 PM

So, how do you feel about design in your life? Do you actively search it out to be part of your living space? Are you aware of how design and function are interrelated? Do you care?

:wub:

Droog:

Posted Image

Memphis Group:

Posted Image


I bought a design book, it's beautiful. It was 100 bucks, but the store I bought it from is having clearance sales and I'm afraid to see it there for 60. It's very think and contain a great general overview of Design from William Morris to Jonathan Ive.

#4 thee radical eclectic

thee radical eclectic

    White Blood Cells

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 8,754 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 05:29 PM

Droog:

Posted Image


im a big repurpose fan... reclaimation design has a lot of personable notions that move me to appreciate the little things i suppose

#5 sunhouse

sunhouse

    White Blood Cells

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7,991 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 06:21 PM

^ huh?

that is one cool innovative unexpected solution to the bureau. order out of chaos and tied together in a circle. inspired. boxes thinking outside the box.

#6 thee radical eclectic

thee radical eclectic

    White Blood Cells

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 8,754 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 08:00 PM

im a big repurpose fan... reclaimation design has a lot of personable notions that move me to appreciate the little things i suppose


items made with love... crafted with genius... these things have a greater value than one purpose or one life to one person's take on process as a product/application... the person and their notions become co=creators of some fine vision nearly lost because of a broken latch or unhinged element or load bearing capacity... i am inspired to reclaim these discarded expressions of function and appreciation

is this the explaination in question ? :wacko: :D

#7 sunhouse

sunhouse

    White Blood Cells

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7,991 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 08:17 PM

items made with love... crafted with genius... these things have a greater value than one purpose or one life to one person's take on process as a product/application... the person and their notions become co=creators of some fine vision nearly lost because of a broken latch or unhinged element or load bearing capacity... i am inspired to reclaim these discarded expressions of function and appreciation


i'm happy for you.

#8 macwacky

macwacky

    The White Stripes

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,237 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 08:43 PM

Posted Image

boxes thinking outside the box.


darn tootin' :D

#9 figmund

figmund

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,109 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 09:33 PM

So, how do you feel about design in your life? Do you actively search it out to be part of your living space? Are you aware of how design and function are interrelated? Do you care?

thank you for this thread, lindear! i love you!
(and, taro, i love the droog cabinets!)


i care a great deal about design, partly because my parents had almost no regard for it. i grew up in houses bursting at the joists with old, mismatched things from my great-grandparents and grandparents, as well as things my parents had purchased (usually for their utilitarian or economical qualities)--all assembled with brash disregard for aesthetics. i used to like to browse in antique shops when i was in high school, but i was often appalled by what i saw there--"that's not an antique--i have one of those in my house!" my great-grandfather had attended the bauhaus in its heyday, so lots of the stuff in his house was from the era of "good design," and captured that spirit. unfortunately, by the time i moved into his house, much of that stuff was yellowed and decrepit, and i didn't know enough to even appreciate it. i was young and foolish and liked dali and escher and superfluous rococo shit.

as soon as left for college, i discovered modern art and modern design. it was like a whole world opened up to me. malevich and lissitzky and mondrian showed me the delight and significance of relationships that people can have with objects in space (if that makes sense). and spending time in my future in-laws' houses, which were minimalist and furnished from the moma catalog, showed me the abstruse sense of internal harmony that can come from being surrounded by beautiful objects, carefully curated for aesthetic purposes.

ever since, i've pretty much only bought things that fit a modern aesthetic, and that i find pleasing as objects in themselves. but i refuse to buy anything that looks cute but doesn't function well. it seems like lots of industrial designers today don't seem to give function as much consideration as form.

#10 thee radical eclectic

thee radical eclectic

    White Blood Cells

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 8,754 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 09:35 PM

i'm happy for you.


it is a pleasure to be genuine and honor the authentic really... and yet my pragmatism would have you understand how massive such ideas are when they are pragmatically applied to systems of personal support etc.

this conversation is starting to remind me of the interview with Pamela Des Barres relative to how my spirit is tied to my creative beliefs

#11 macwacky

macwacky

    The White Stripes

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 18,237 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 11:42 PM

i care a great deal about design, partly because my parents had almost no regard for it.

it seemed that way for me at one point. I felt like we were furnished by the set designer for the Jetsons or Ren & Stimpy.

#12 lindapoirier

lindapoirier

    De Stijl

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,515 posts

Posted 13 April 2011 - 11:59 PM

The first two look a bit like shuttlecocks. Just happy I had an occasion write that sentence, really.


they do!! we always called them badminton birdies, though.

think of the advantages modern athletes owe to design and especially new materials used in modern rackets and balls and bats... and on.


:wub:

Memphis Group:

Posted Image


this is from the 80s? i don't really like the colours of some of the iconic pieces and there is a bit to much "quirky" for me. but i do love the 80s because there is so much homage to the past. so many designs integrate such reverence for the past. i.e. michael graves. i also love 80s two-piece suits because all you have to do is remove the shoulder pads and voila, a wonderful 40s outfit!

I bought a design book, it's beautiful. It was 100 bucks, but the store I bought it from is having clearance sales and I'm afraid to see it there for 60. It's very think and contain a great general overview of Design from William Morris to Jonathan Ive.


i have some books, most gifted to me. i have a purely pedestrian question at this point: do your libraries sell their old books? i have been given so many books via library sales. they are usually a great deal and great for me because i've got so many 50s and 60s gems that no one else seems to want. one that i love isn't a library book but it was a gift. Miller's 20th Century Design.

i am inspired to reclaim these discarded expressions of function and appreciation

when my mother pasted away, i inherited 60 acres and i am trying to build an A-frame house this summer. i plan to reuse the boards on our family barn as flooring on my main and loft levels. i spent my entire childhood in that barn and nothing would thrill me more than to have that barn underfoot. i will have to plane the boards and seal them to avoid splinters on my feet but it will be worth it, imo.

thank you for this thread, lindear! i love you!
(and, taro, i love the droog cabinets!)

i care a great deal about design... malevich and lissitzky and mondrian showed me the delight and significance of relationships that people can have with objects in space (if that makes sense). and spending time in my future in-laws' houses, which were minimalist and furnished from the moma catalog, showed me the abstruse sense of internal harmony that can come from being surrounded by beautiful objects, carefully curated for aesthetic purposes.

ever since, i've pretty much only bought things that fit a modern aesthetic, and that i find pleasing as objects in themselves. but i refuse to buy anything that looks cute but doesn't function well. it seems like lots of industrial designers today don't seem to give function as much consideration as form.


yes! i so understand what you are saying. i don't know how minimalist i can ever be, i adore so many things and i don't think that i could NOT collect. alas, i am trying. i think, in my own home, i will try harder because i want "my home" to really reflect my beliefs. that IS important to me.

in my dress too, i try to express my own ideas about design. i adore the juxtaposition of different eras. sometimes two very different styles flow together and "work" and create a dramatic personal statement. IMO!

Edited by lindapoirier, 14 April 2011 - 12:38 AM.


#13 SuzyLee135

SuzyLee135

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,522 posts

Posted 14 April 2011 - 06:06 AM

Ever since I was little I have always adored 1930s Art Deco - everything about it is just so perfect to me, so effortlessly stylish. Last year I finally got to go here:

Posted Image

Eltham Palace

It was a complete dream come true, if I could have stayed there forever I would have been a very happy woman

Posted Image

Posted Image

What amazes me most about Art Deco is how modern some of it looks - like the drawing room above


Posted Image

#14 Maschine Man

Maschine Man

    De Stijl

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,161 posts

Posted 14 April 2011 - 06:36 AM

^ Art deco is one of my favourite eras. The first time industrial design really kicked off and it produced some of the greatest objects ever.


No Design thread is complete until it has some Starck in it:
Posted Image

Although I love everything the Juicy Salif embodies, I feel as if I owned one, it would be tacky.

#15 sunhouse

sunhouse

    White Blood Cells

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 7,991 posts

Posted 14 April 2011 - 06:49 AM

^ Art deco is one of my favourite eras. The first time industrial design really kicked off and it produced some of the greatest objects ever.


No Design thread is complete until it has some Starck in it:
Posted Image

Although I love everything the Juicy Salif embodies, I feel as if I owned one, it would be tacky.


wow could anything be more perfect to define that style? reminds me of the rocket ship at burning man 2 years ago. i was wearing a red soviet issue cosmonaut jumpsuit and got to sit in it for the touristas. it was impeccably realized. with 30's deco control panels, bakelite knobs, stainless retro buck rodgers interior.

http://youtu.be/kf6a-xwEvGM

linda is it true you picked up that starck at a garage sale a while back for like 2 dollars? or did i dream that.

#16 lindapoirier

lindapoirier

    De Stijl

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,515 posts

Posted 14 April 2011 - 07:29 AM

Deco makes me salivate. Iconic! I know that term is thrown around far to frivolously but it really is so important in the "design" world. You are so right about it's timeless aesthetic. I'd kill for a bronze dancing girl with ivory face!! YOu are so lucky to have seen Eltham. I would have hid out and waited until they closed down and taken a bath in that tub. MY GOD it's amazing!!!

I love LOVE the Turner Classic Movies channel. I will be honest that I watch it to see design, sometimes. "Teach me gold Pawnbroker", ha! Give me that apartment dude!! And the clothes!! Don't get me started. It's my goal to get a row of bracelets like Blanche has in 'Streetcar'. Everyone says, "STELLA S T E L L A!!!" I say, give me those bracelets!!!

pat! It was $1. The dude didn't even know what it was and was happy to be rid of it. HA! Does getting one for a dollar make it less tacky to own? I sure hope so.

Posted Image

It does look like that "holy fucking shit that's cool" rocket. I would love to have seen the inside. You are one lucky Comrade! Do you still have the jumpsuit? That might be considered an iconic piece!

Speaking of rocket ships! Look at these egg cups.

Posted Image

Edit. I thought this might be appreciated... ?
http://www.etsy.com/...f=fp_treasury_2

Edited by lindapoirier, 14 April 2011 - 07:59 AM.


#17 Maschine Man

Maschine Man

    De Stijl

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,161 posts

Posted 14 April 2011 - 08:02 AM

The awkward moment when you kinda imply that an object is tacky and then your friend owns said object. It wasn't meant to come out that way. :mellow:


I too watch films and enjoy when I see cool designs. Metropolis. It has that great 10 hour clock and a really cool lamp:

Posted Image

kinda like this, but the whole shaft is a lamp and there is a rotating shade so the light doesn't get in your eyes.


Edit: 1 Dollar? Holy shit.

Oh and the "bird" book case made me chuckle.

Edited by D :, 14 April 2011 - 08:04 AM.


#18 procrastinatingagain

procrastinatingagain

    Icky Thump

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 216 posts

Posted 14 April 2011 - 09:45 AM

pat! It was $1. The dude didn't even know what it was and was happy to be rid of it. HA! Does getting one for a dollar make it less tacky to own? I sure hope so.

Posted Image



If you are ever short on cash you could sell your juicer!

http://www.google.co...ed=0CDEQ8wIwAg#

#19 figmund

figmund

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,109 posts

Posted 14 April 2011 - 10:27 AM

i always think of linda whenever i see a juicy salif! i think it's a perfect little object.

also, i am very fond of this book--george nelson's "how to see
http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/0974491802

and frank gehry's pito kettle for alessi:
Posted Image


#20 figmund

figmund

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 4,109 posts

Posted 14 April 2011 - 01:43 PM

these super-tiny espresso spoons by fuksas (and fuksas) took my breath away. i couldn't stop staring at them. at 11cm long, they are the smallest object in alessi's cutlery collection. just after saw them at the alessi store, i went to a museum exhibit on the modern kitchen, but in the whole thing, i did not see a more gorgeous object.

Posted Image



and matching e-li-li espresso cups:
Posted Image




tutti (i assure you, they are way lovelier in person):
Posted Image





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users