Jump to content


Photo

STAR WARS!

No spoilers for a while

  • Please log in to reply
65 replies to this topic

#41 Kali Durga

Kali Durga

    The White Stripes

  • Little Room Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,695 posts

Posted 26 December 2015 - 09:13 PM

Hahahaha...  https://twitter.com/KyloR3n



#42 J.C.

J.C.

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,855 posts

Posted 27 December 2015 - 03:26 AM

Saw it in 2D...

 

This is a perfectly familiar and enjoyable Star Wars picture: nothing

more, nothing less. The new characters (Rey, Finn, and Poe) are
likable, designed to cater to a wide audience without possessing
particularly distinct or intriguing personality traits. Which is fine
for a first installment, but hopefully they're given more nuance and
shading in future films, because the actors seem game.


I had hoped seeing this in 2D would resolve some of my earlier
complaints about the 3D version, but it turns out the visuals, overall,
ARE pretty murky and uninspired in nature. There are a few isolated
moments of visual poetry (Kylo Ren gazing through the battleship window
at the giant red ray; the light sabre battle in the snowy forest), but
in most instances, the word "workmanlike" springs most instantly to
mind, which is par for the course for director JJ Abrams. I'm fairly
confident director Rian Johnson will bring a bit more visual ingenuity
to Episode VIII.


Dialogue is adequate (certainly an upgrade from the cringeworthy
variety found in the prequels), and most of the actors engender enough
goodwill from the audience to sell it without too many hiccups. That
said, I doubt many viewers will find themselves quoting any lines from
the script in the near future, and nothing the characters say inspires
even a second of thought a few moments after it's spoken. Genuine
emotional or thematic complexity has never been this series' strong
suit, and that's typified by a mostly one-note villain presentation
(Kylo Ren has potential, but it's only hinted at here, despite pretty

good work from Adam Driver).


But what this series does possess is a corny, self-deprecating,
ultimately endearing quality that extends to just about its entire
ensemble, but is particularly present in its quirky alien creations, its
resident Wookie, and its cute little robots. This helps to paper over
shortcomings in other areas, and the swift pacing rarely forces you to
linger on any of its bigger plot contrivances (not that those matter all
that much with this type of film anyways).


Now that Disney and Lucasfilm have re-established the familiar style
and thematic elements of the series to help recapture most of the
fanbase (many of which became disillusioned by the prequels), here's
hoping they're willing to take more creative risks with future
installments, and really add something special and unique to the legacy
of the series, rather than simply rebooting it for a new generation with
advanced production values.

 

3 1/2 Stars-out-of-5


Edited by J.C., 27 December 2015 - 03:28 AM.


#43 billdore

billdore

    White Blood Cells

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6,276 posts

Posted 27 December 2015 - 02:41 PM

Yeah, it will be interesting to see the different approaches from the director, particularly without having Lucas as producer overseeing and stamping his approval on this set.  I agree Abrams did a fine job--at least he dialed his beloved lens flare back!  He really went nuts with them in Star Trek (09).

 

The different story line films will be interesting, too, with Rogue One being released next year.  Disney has stated they'll release a new Star Wars film every year for at least the next six years...



#44 J.C.

J.C.

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,855 posts

Posted 27 December 2015 - 11:11 PM

They'll probably have more creative freedom with the spinoff films, but Disney might be pushing it, and creating audience fatigue, by having a new one every year.  I mean, heck, Episode VIII is only ~eighteen months away.

 

I've heard rumblings that Abrams is kind of pissed that he's not directing the next one, as it's reputed to have a significantly superior script.


Edited by J.C., 27 December 2015 - 11:12 PM.


#45 imbenurnot

imbenurnot

    White Blood Cells

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6,207 posts

Posted 28 December 2015 - 09:48 AM

I think we can agree that spoiler tags are no longer necessary, right? The uncontested Christmas day deadline suggested earlier is past, so we should be in the clear.

I agree that one movie every year seems like too much. At the very least, if the marketing blitz remains as strong every year, people are going to be sick as fuck of Star Wars by the time Episode VIII rolls around, never mind Episode IX. The movies themselves could work for a while, if they do something different with the movies. Rogue One sounds like a cool idea for a movie, so I'm looking forward to it. It's not much different than the Marvel Cinematic Universe, though I think those movies are starting to become a bit of a chore. I just do not really want to see prequel movies about individual characters. I think we know everything we need to know about Han Solo or Yoda. Give us something we don't already know the end to, please!

I'm still stunned by the gargantuan (you know, I've always liked that word "gargantuan," but you so rarely get to use it in a sentence) amount of money this movie has made.



#46 J.C.

J.C.

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,855 posts

Posted 28 December 2015 - 08:07 PM

I think we can agree that spoiler tags are no longer necessary, right? The uncontested Christmas day deadline suggested earlier is past, so we should be in the clear.

 

Thanks goodness for that!  You know, I still can't believe C3PO had his way with R2-D2 while R2 was in low energy mode, and BB8 just stood there and flicked his lighter.  Filth, I tells ya!


Edited by J.C., 28 December 2015 - 08:08 PM.


#47 ElectricitysGhost

ElectricitysGhost

    White Blood Cells

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6,457 posts

Posted 30 December 2015 - 02:58 PM

I think we can agree that spoiler tags are no longer necessary, right? The uncontested Christmas day deadline suggested earlier is past, so we should be in the clear.

I agree that one movie every year seems like too much. At the very least, if the marketing blitz remains as strong every year, people are going to be sick as fuck of Star Wars by the time Episode VIII rolls around, never mind Episode IX. The movies themselves could work for a while, if they do something different with the movies. Rogue One sounds like a cool idea for a movie, so I'm looking forward to it. It's not much different than the Marvel Cinematic Universe, though I think those movies are starting to become a bit of a chore. I just do not really want to see prequel movies about individual characters. I think we know everything we need to know about Han Solo or Yoda. Give us something we don't already know the end to, please!

I'm still stunned by the gargantuan (you know, I've always liked that word "gargantuan," but you so rarely get to use it in a sentence) amount of money this movie has made.

 

I thought I was the only person on earth who was sick of the Marvel Cinematic Universe movies. Enough, already. Christ.

 

(Daredevil and Jessica Jones were two of my favorite shows this year, but I thought they were miles above the MCU movies in terms of writing and pretty much everything else). 



#48 stripes42

stripes42

    De Stijl

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,787 posts

Posted 30 December 2015 - 06:02 PM

i'm not surprised this made such a gargantuan amount of money.  i think the timing was right.  but i hate the thought of being buried in Star Wars for the coming decade.  unfortunately, what will determine whether this happens or not are economics.  if studies show they will make more money this way rather than the way most of us would like it to happen (a quality movie every few years) then they will saturate us and our children and our children's children with junk.  :/



#49 J.C.

J.C.

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,855 posts

Posted 30 December 2015 - 09:06 PM

Gosh, now I'm wondering if it's gonna hit $1 billion DOMESTICALLY.  It's definitely going to beat Avatar in North America, the only question is by how much.  Worldwide, it'll obviously beat Titanic (money-, if not attendance-, wise), but I'll be curious to see how it performs in China, where the Star Wars franchise has never been particularly big.



#50 stripes42

stripes42

    De Stijl

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,787 posts

Posted 04 January 2016 - 01:55 PM

maybe all hope is not lost:  http://electricliter...me-great-books/

And now, with the announcement of this new movie, the big-budget film establishment has seemingly noticed the quiet brilliance of a story about normal people in a universe of the extraordinary. Because if Rogue One ends up being a loose film adaptation of the wonderful Stackpole and Allston books, then the filmmakers will know they have to throw in everything plus the kitchen sick. And by that, I mean they’ll throw in the outer-space-kitchen-sink drama.


#51 billdore

billdore

    White Blood Cells

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6,276 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 12:04 AM

https://www.facebook...5086277?fref=nf

 

Saw this posted and rather enjoyed it.


Edited by billdore, 08 January 2016 - 12:05 AM.


#52 J.C.

J.C.

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,855 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 04:11 AM

Generally speaking, referring to (supposed) plot holes in a movie as "unforgivable" is, 90% of the time, being laughably melodramatic.  And the people who write those types of articles often play willfully dumb, ignoring things that are blatantly obvious to anyone paying reasonably close attention to what's on the screen.

 

That said, those who try to dismiss every last potential plot hole (in a product that is clearly and deliberately given to contrivance) by relying on pure speculation (about future installments, or whatnot), and get really worked up over it, can be equally ridiculous.

 

Click-bait-Hate culture is indeed tiresome, but you're only playing into their hands by giving them your full attention.  And people who most frequently dismiss films (particularly those in the sci-fi/fantasy genre) purely on the basis of plot, aren't responding to the medium on a particularly high level anyways.  There are so many other facets of film making that should be taken into account when evaluating a movie, at least from where I'm standing.



#53 joeldalley

joeldalley

    Icky Thump

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 390 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 08:07 AM

I was with him up until the reference to Star Wars ring theory. That's some stupid goddamn retarded shit. Not only is that ring composition analysis of the prequels completely desperate and stupid, but the author also uses it as his justification for why it's okay that this Star Wars movie was basically just a soft reboot of the first Star Wars film. When in fact the explanation is much, much simpler: it was safe. It was the safe road to travel. Everything about the new Star Wars movie reeks of calculation. Coloring well within the lines. Which I'm actually okay with, as I wrote in my original comment here about the movie. I'm okay with it not because I thought the movie was that great (it wasn't), but because at least it avoids being terrible (which the prequels didn't do).

Maybe it's sort of condescending, but I'm mostly happy about the new Star Wars movie because of what it offers young children. They get to have a real Star Wars movie, like I had (I was born only one month after the original movie was released in theaters, and my first theater experience was Empire, at age three). So I pat these children on the head and say "Good for you, little Johnny and Janey. Lucky you." As to all the grown men and women my age who think it's the best movie of the year or decade or anything else, all I can do is shake my head and despair for the future of humanity, what with these man- and woman-children refusing to grow up or apparently unable to refine and develop their tastes and interests beyond those matching a seven year-old.



#54 Kali Durga

Kali Durga

    The White Stripes

  • Little Room Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,695 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 11:56 AM

Maybe it's sort of condescending, but I'm mostly happy about the new Star Wars movie because of what it offers young children. They get to have a real Star Wars movie, like I had (I was born only one month after the original movie was released in theaters, and my first theater experience was Empire, at age three). So I pat these children on the head and say "Good for you, little Johnny and Janey. Lucky you." As to all the grown men and women my age who think it's the best movie of the year or decade or anything else, all I can do is shake my head and despair for the future of humanity, what with these man- and woman-children refusing to grow up or apparently unable to refine and develop their tastes and interests beyond those matching a seven year-old.

 

Hear, hear. And that's from a woman-child who refuses to grow up but still recognizes that this film was not the best thing ever. It's a re-boot of one of the best things ever and it may lead to more things in the future that fall into the "best ever" category. Or it may not. But it will definitely be cool to watch a new generation get all excited over it.



#55 J.C.

J.C.

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,855 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 05:49 PM

Um, I think Joel was sort of implying -- well, more or less stating -- that even the original wasn't the "best thing ever", but you'd have to check with him to be sure.


Edited by J.C., 08 January 2016 - 05:50 PM.


#56 Kali Durga

Kali Durga

    The White Stripes

  • Little Room Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,695 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 07:33 PM

For the impact they created, the original trio were "best things ever".  They broke new ground. In comparison, this one doesn't.



#57 J.C.

J.C.

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,855 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 07:52 PM

Well....they were Flash Gordon with a little Hidden Fortress by Kurosawa, but yes, they did have cultural impact.



#58 joeldalley

joeldalley

    Icky Thump

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 390 posts

Posted 08 January 2016 - 09:15 PM

Well, don't forget the scene where Luke returns home to the ranch, only to see it burning. This is an identical shot to the one in The Searchers, when John Wayne's character and his companion return to the ranch to see it burning. It must be deliberate homage, just on the basis of the visual similarity--but I don't know that for sure, I haven't read Lucas saying so.

 

The first Star Wars movie is culturally significant, no doubt. It's a bit like Jaws. A b-movie concept, done as an A-movie, and done extremely well. I don't know about "best thing ever," but I do know that it made a huge impact on my when I was a kid, all throughout my childhood, which was perfectly timed to go with the three movies and all the toys, which we had. So I'm not really sure I can objectively judge the movie. Most of my good feelings about the movie are likely pure nostalgia for the first half of my childhood.



#59 billdore

billdore

    White Blood Cells

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 6,276 posts

Posted 07 April 2016 - 09:06 PM

Well, Rogue One looks pretty stupid so far.

 

 



#60 J.C.

J.C.

    Elephant

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,855 posts

Posted 07 April 2016 - 09:39 PM

I don't feel one way or the other about it, but care to elaborate on your position?  Most people I've seen comment online seem to be pretty happy with the trailer...well, aside from those dudebros who don't like that it, like TFA, has a female lead.

 

Methinks most hardcore Star Wars fans will eat this up, if only because it's got the giant walkers in it.  :lol: 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users